miércoles, 18 de junio de 2014

Efecto analgésico de ketamina i.v. durante raquia en la embarazada para cesárea. Estudio clínico randomizado

Efecto analgésico de ketamina i.v. durante raquia en la embarazada para cesárea. Estudio clínico randomizado



Analgesic Effects of Intravenous Ketamine during Spinal Anesthesia in Pregnant Women Undergone Caesarean Section; A Randomized Clinical Trial.Behdad S, Hajiesmaeili MR, Abbasi HR, Ayatollahi V, Khadiv Z, Sedaghat A.
Anesth Pain Med. 2013 Sep;3(2):230-3. doi: 10.5812/aapm.7034. Epub 2013 Sep 1.
Abstract
BACKGROUND:Suitable analgesia after cesarean section helps mothers to be more comfortable and increases their mobility and ability to take better care of their infants. OBJECTIVES:Pain relief properties of ketamine prescription were assessed in women with elective cesarean section who underwent spinal anesthesia with low dose intravenous ketamine and midazolam and intravenous midazolam alone. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty pregnant women scheduled for spinal anesthesia for cesarean section were randomized into two study groups. Ketamine (30 mg) + midazolam (1 mg = 2CC) or 1mg midazolam (2CC) alone, was given immediately after spinal anesthesia. Pain scores at first, second and third hours after CS operation, analgesic requirement and drug adverse effects were recorded in all patients. RESULTS: Ketamine group had significant pain relief properties in compare with control group in first hours after cesarean section (0.78 ± 1.09 vs. 1.72 ± 1.22, VAS score, P = 0.00). Total dose of meperidine consumption in women of ketamine group was significantly lower than women of control group (54.17 ± 12.86 vs. 74.44 ± 33.82 mg, P = 0.02). There were no significant drug side effects in participated patients. CONCLUSIONS: Intravenous low-dose ketamine combined with midazolam for sedation during spinal anesthesia for elective Caesarean section provides more effective and long lasting pain relief than control group.
KEYWORDS: Analgesia; Anesthesia, Spinal; Cesarean Section; Ketamine; Pain Clinics


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3833040/pdf/aapm-03-230.pdf

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3833040/



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Anestesiología y Medicina del Dolor
www.anestesia-dolor.org
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